How Employers Can Help Stop Rising Drug Use

Drug Use PEXELS

As the pandemic continues more adults are using drugs to treat their mental health conditions. According to the CDC, feelings of anxiety have risen during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. To supplement these feelings adults are using marijuana, which poses concerns for companies across the country.

In a study from the International Journal of Drug Policy, 47% of participants responded that their substance use has increased during COVID-19. These staggering numbers indicate a bigger issue of how to handle mental health and drug use in the workplace.

With workers coming back into the office as places reopen, it’s possible that these new drug habits are also being transitioned into the workplace. Companies that do not help inform their staff of the dangers of drug-use on the clock, or do not have an effective drug testing policy, are increasing their risk.

RECOGNIZING WARNING SIGNS

Certain behaviors occur frequently amongst substance abusers. These behaviors do not always indicate a substance abuse problem, but may warrant discussions with the particular employee. Key indicators of substance abuse can include:

  • Increase of accidents, inside and outside of the workplace
  • Unexplained absences or frequent disappearances
  • Excessive use of sick days, typically with late notice
  • Increased time to complete standard tasks
  • Isolating from friends and coworkers
  • Poor hygiene and worsening appearance

HOW TO HELP EMPLOYEES COPE

A common reason for drug use is as a mental health coping tactic. Whether it’s addressing anxiety, looking to focus on their work, or simply an escape from their current situation, they believe drugs can help them cope.

This provides an avenue for companies to help its employees manage their mental health. A few ways employers can help include:

  • Adding mental health coverage to medical plan offerings
  • Reduce stigma around mental health, and communicate resources
  • Promote well-being through workplace wellness or scheduling flexibility

Of course there are plenty of other ways businesses can help address mental health issues in the workplace; asking employees through an anonymous survey can provide insights as to exactly how your business can help.

IMPLEMENT EFFECTIVE DRUG TESTING POLICIES

With workers returning to the workplace, a comprehensive drug testing policy can limit your business’s liability and risk of incidents. While workers may not use drugs on the clock as soon as they’re back in the office, establishing an effective policy can help identify employees that need help over time. Five steps of implementing this new or revamped policy should include:

  • Draft a policy that is compliant with state and federal laws
  • Train supervisors on reasonable suspicion and warning signs of drug use
  • Train your employees on the parameters of the policy
  • Provide Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) to help stop addictions
  • Follow through with drug testing

At ARCpoint Labs, we’re dedicated to keeping work environments free of drug and alcohol use. Our employer services include everything from drug policy development to ongoing testing for your team. With a nationwide network of labs, our industry experts are ready to help your business stay productive as we return to normal. Contact your local ARCpoint Labs office for more information on how to get started.

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Employee Drug Testing by State

person holding marijuana

Developing an effective drug testing policy can be difficult with more states legalizing recreational and medicinal marijuana use. Currently, a total of 36 states and the District of Columbia allow medicinal marijuana, and 16 of those states allow full recreational usage. Without an overarching federal regulation regarding drug testing policies, companies are left to establish an effective policy that limits its risk. 

At ARCpoint Labs, we’re committed to helping businesses develop safe and effective drug testing policies. From the initial policy development to specimen collection, our industry experts can help limit your company’s risk and stay compliant with changing regulations. Learn more about how ARCpoint Labs can help your company and find your nearest location to get started. 

We’ve gathered a drug testing breakdown by each state to help your company get a head start on developing an effective policy. For more information on your state’s requirements, contact your local ARCpoint Labs. 

Alabama: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized after an applicant is given notice of drug-testing policy and an offer of employment. 
  • Random testing, reasonable suspicion, on-job injuries, as part of fitness-for-duty exams, and follow-up testing is allowed.
  • Employees must receive 60 days’ advanced notice of testing policy. 

Alaska: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is not restricted. Positive results or refusals may be grounds for not hiring.
  • Random testing and job-related purpose testing is allowed. 
  • Employees must receive 30 days’ notice and a written policy statement must be given.

Arizona: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant is informed in writing beforehand. Refusal to test may be used as a basis for not hiring. 
  • Random testing and job-related purpose testing is allowed. 
  • Employees must receive a written drug testing policy. 
  • Positive results or refusals can result in discipline or discharge. 

California: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized. Prior notice of test may be required. 
  • Employee testing may only be required based on reasonable suspicion. 
  • Random testing may be limited to safety-sensitive positions.

Connecticut: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant is informed in writing beforehand.
  • Previous employees may not be tested unless they’ve been away from the job for at least 12 months.
  • Testing is authorized on reasonable suspicion, random testing may be limited to safety-sensitive positions.
  • Positive results or refusals can result in discipline or discharge.

Delaware: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program. 

Florida: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant is informed in writing beforehand. Refusal to test may be used as a basis for not hiring. 
  • Testing for reasonable suspicion, on-job injuries, as part of fitness-for-duty exams, and follow-up testing is allowed.
  • Employees must receive 60 days’ advanced notice of testing policy. 

Georgia: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized.
  • Random testing, reasonable suspicion, on-job injuries, as part of fitness-for-duty exams, and follow-up testing is allowed.
  • Drug testing policies must be posted and distributed to employees.

Hawaii: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized with advanced written notice.
  • Testing of employees is authorized with advanced written notice of substances to be tested for, and disclosure of current prescriptions/medication.

Idaho: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized.
  • Testing of employees is authorized with advanced written notice. 

Illinois: Marijuana use is legal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program. 

Indiana: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program. 

Iowa: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized with advanced oral or written notice.
  • Random testing must adhere to local law of using random computer-generated number to identify employees to test. 
  • Probable cause or annual physical testing is authorized with 30 days’ notice.

Kansas: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized for safety-sensitive positions.
  • Employee testing based on reasonable suspicion. 
  • First-time offenders are able to undergo drug evaluation and recommended treatment for state positions. 

Kentucky: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program. 

Louisiana: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized and not restricted.
  • Employee testing is authorized, and first-time offenders may not be discharged.

Maine: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant has been offered employment. Refusal or positive may be used as basis for not hiring.
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion that is not based solely on a workplace accident. 
  • Random testing is authorized after a previous positive test. 
  • Positive tests may result in discipline, discharge, or referral for counseling and treatment. 

Maryland: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized and not restricted.
  • Employee testing is authorized if supported by a legitimate business reason. 

Massachusetts: Marijuana use is legal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program. 

Michigan: Marijuana use is legal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program. 

Minnesota: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant has been offered employment.
  • Random testing is authorized for safety-sensitive positions
  • Testing after an accident, as part of an employee assistance program, reasonable suspicion, and part of an annual physical exam is authorized. 
  • Employees must have two weeks’ notice before testing can occur. 

Mississippi: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is not subject to restriction. 
  • Employee testing is authorized on reasonable suspicion, in connection with rehabilitation or treatment, as part of an annual physical exam. 
  • Random testing is subject to collective bargaining agreements. 
  • Positive results or refusals can result in discipline or discharge.

Missouri: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program. 

Montana: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized for safety-sensitive positions.
  • Employee testing is authorized including random testing, reasonable suspicion, as part of an annual physical exam, and/or after a work-related accident causing injury or damage of $1,500 or more.

Nebraska: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

Nevada: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized for safety-sensitive positions.
  • Employee testing is authorized for safety-sensitive positions. 
  • Positive results may result in referral for counseling, discipline, or discharge.

New Hampshire: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

New Jersey: Marijuana use is legal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

New Mexico: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use will be legal by April 1, 2022.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

New York: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized for safety-sensitive positions. 
  • Positive results must not be used to reject an applicant. 
  • The recent Cannabis/Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act protects an employees usage of marijuana when off-duty. Testing is still at the liberty of the employers to determine. 

North Carolina: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

North Dakota: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

Ohio: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant has been notified beforehand and offered employment.
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion, after a workplace incident, or as part of a treatment program. 

Oklahoma: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant has been notified beforehand and offered employment. Notice to be in writing, describing methods, procedures, and policies in detail.
  • Employee testing is authorized with 30 days’ notice and a written policy statement must be given.

Oregon: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if reasonable suspicion of drug use exists. 
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion. 

Pennsylvania: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

Rhode Island: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant has been offered employment.
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion and in conjunction with a rehabilitation program. 
  • Random testing is prohibited.

South Carolina: Marijuana use is illegal. 

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized and not restricted.
  • Employee testing is authorized with follow-up tests within 30 minutes of initial test. 

South Dakota: Marijuana use will be legal as of July 1, 2021.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized for safety-sensitive positions after the applicant has been offered employment. 
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion. 

Tennessee: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized and not restricted. 
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion, but counseling and rehabilitation must be offered to applicable positions. 

Texas: Marijuana use is illegal. 

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

Utah: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational use is illegal.

  • Pre-employment testing is not restricted for private sector positions. Refusal or positive may be used as basis for not hiring.
  • Employee testing is authorized when the employer’s written policy is distributed to all employees, in cases of potential impairment, workplace accidents, theft, or production/safety maintenance.
  • Positive tests or refusals are subject to rehabilitation or disciplinary action. 

Vermont: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant has been notified beforehand and offered employment, or part of a pre-employment physical.
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion, and as part of an employee assistance program.
  • Random testing is prohibited. 
  • Positive tests may result in a suspension for rehabilitation but may not result in a discharge after first positive test. 

Virginia: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational marijuana use will be legal on July 1, 2021.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

Washington: Marijuana use is legal.

  • Pre-employment testing is authorized if the applicant has a written notification beforehand and offered employment. 
  • Employee testing is authorized based on reasonable suspicion, random testing, workplace accidents, or as part of an employee assistance program.
  • Employees must receive 60 days’ advanced notice of testing policy. 

West Virginia: Medicinal marijuana use is legal. Recreational marijuana use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

Wisconsin: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.

Wyoming: Marijuana use is illegal.

  • No current state statutes, regulations, or court decisions that limit an employer’s drug or alcohol testing program.
  • As state regulations vary, trust the experts when developing your drug testing policy. Learn more how ARCpoint can help your company limit its liability and provide a safe, drug-free environment for all employees. 

[Source]

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Employers Guide to State-Specific Medical Marijuana Authorizations

employer drug testing

Written by Nick Hartman with Drug Screening Compliance Institute and published here as our guest writer.

dcsi

 

 

You receive a positive drug test result for marijuana – your employee or applicant says they have a medical marijuana card. What happens next?

An issue that has become increasingly impactful and confusing for employers conducting employee drug and alcohol testing is the new requirements related to medical marijuana laws in states authorizing such use.

More than half of the states and some U.S. Territories permit the medical use of marijuana to treat specific medical conditions. Each state’s law differs. The language of the medical marijuana laws in several states (and growing) expressly prohibits an employer from discriminating against an individual due to their status as a qualified medical marijuana patient.

Positive Test – Now What?

We will start with the obvious, for federally regulated drug screens (Department of Transportation (DOT), federal grant recipients, etc.), the answer is an easy one. The DOT has made it very clear that the use of state-authorized marijuana will not be a valid excuse for a federal drug test.

As an industry best practice, employers will utilize the services of a federally licensed Medical Review Officer (MRO) to, at the very least, review laboratory-confirmed positive drug test results before they are reported back to the employer. The MRO or MRO team will typically conduct a confidential interview with the donor and allow them to provide any medically verifiable evidence as to why the screening result was positive.[1] Based on any evidence presented and whether or not that information can be verified and justified as the reason for the positive test result, the MRO will either overturn the result to a ‘negative’ or uphold the result as ‘positive’ and submit the test result to the employer.

The MRO plays a critical role to make sure that a positive test result was not due to a legally prescribed medication and to prevent an employer from potentially taking adverse action against an individual’s legitimate use of a prescribed drug in violation of disability discrimination laws.

Compared to prescription medication, the difference with medical marijuana is that marijuana remains a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA), thus being illegal to use or possess under federal law. With medical marijuana being authorized by more than two-thirds of the states in our country, hardly any employer is immune to this issue. Based on our research, MROs have primarily taken the stance that they will not make additional efforts to verify state-issued medical marijuana authorization. Presumably, the main reasons are since marijuana cannot be ‘prescribed’ like other Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved substances listed in Schedules II-V of the CSA. MROs all cite the fear of potentially jeopardizing their federal MRO certification. As this issue continues to grow, MROs are starting to reevaluate their role and how best to accommodate this growing impact on employers.

If you have not done so already, contact your Third-Party Associate (TPA), service provider, or MRO to clearly understand the scope of their role and what requirements remain to you as the employer.

Suggested Procedure for Employers 

If your MROs policy/agreement does not provide for verification of state-issued medical marijuana authorizations, it is generally suggested that employers should:

1. Understand that the burden of proof that the individual is a legitimate medical marijuana patient rests with the employee or applicant.

2. The employee or applicant should be asked to produce a state-issued medical marijuana card.

3. The employee or applicant should be required to produce a copy of the Written Certification from a physician submitted to the state.

4. The employee or applicant should also be asked to get a note from the issuing physician that states the patient will be able to perform the essential functions of the job they are applying for or expected to conduct by the employer. Side note: here is where the importance of clear and up-to-date job descriptions is critical.

5. The employer has the option to contact the issuing physician and verify the authorization is valid and active.*

*Some states host a medical marijuana registration database, but from our research & experience, the use of these databases by employers and MROs is not permitted.

Based on the validity of the donor’s medical marijuana authorization, the details of the state medical marijuana law, and the specific job the donor will be performing, employers can then make a hiring decision.

To reiterate, the medical marijuana rules in each state will differ. The details in the language of the laws are critical to understanding as you draft internal procedures.

Action Steps for Employers

If you do not have a plan in place today, the time is now to act. Contact your TPA, service provider, or MRO to clearly understand the scope of their role and what requirements remain to you as the employer. Ensure your policy, procedures, and job descriptions are routinely reviewed and updated to stay in compliance with legal changes and to defend legal challenges.

Employers are also strongly encouraged to provide updated manager and supervisor training to ensure their staff is aware of any new laws that impact your screening program, along with any related procedural requirements that they must follow.

SAMPLE: Applicant/Employee Medical Marijuana Authorization Confirmation

As an employer, we do not need nor are we requesting any details related to your underlying medical condition(s) that qualify for your use of medical marijuana. We are simply confirming your authorization to use medical marijuana and that you will be able to perform the essential functions of your job duties safely.

To make an employment decision, we must gather additional information. Please provide us with the following:

1. Provide your state-issued medical marijuana card or authorization.

2. Provide a copy of the Written Certification from your physician that was submitted to the state.

3. Provide the attached job description to your physician. Request a note from your physician that states you will be able to perform the essential functions of the job you are applying for or expected to conduct while being employed by our company. (Job description is attached).

Original Blog Post: https://www.drugscreeningci.com/blog/employers-guide-to-state-specific-medical-marijuana-authorizations

[1] On July 7, 2019, the New Jersey Governor signed an overhaul of the Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act, which added new section 9(b) that requires employers to provide employees or job applicants who are registered qualifying patients with an opportunity to present a legitimate medical explanation for a positive marijuana test. As part of the explanation, the employee or job applicant may present an authorization for medical cannabis issued by a health care practitioner as proof of registration with the state. Nevada also has a requirement to allow applicants/employees an opportunity to rebut the test results.

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Drug Abuse Amidst A Pandemic

person holding marijuana

In an effort to escape or cope with the everyday stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, many across the country may turn to alcohol, prescription medications, or other drug use. Alcohol and drug testing employees as they return to work cannot only help you prevent liability issues, but you can also offer support to your employees that may be trying to find alternative ways to deal with stress. 

The Problem

Stressful situations such as the current pandemic can be emotionally and physically exhausting, from the constant headlines, worrying about the health and safety of loved ones, and anxiety of finances during a time when unemployment is climbing. While some individuals may turn to hobbies and activities to cope with their stressful environments, others may turn to drugs as a solution to temporarily ease themselves. As noted in Mustafa al’Absi’s thesis, “Stress and Addition: Biological Psychological Mechanisms,” there is a direct correlation between addiction and stressful events or ongoing anxiety. With individuals stuck inside and dealing with isolation, there’s no wonder that alcohol sales were up 55% in late March compared to last year as people look to cope with their anxiety or traumatic experiences during the pandemic. 

In a 2018 study, an estimated 164.8 million people over the age of 12 in the United States had used a substance such as illicit drugs, tobacco, or alcohol within the month prior to the survey. The use of substances to help cope with stress is a nationwide issue that many struggle with, and if not careful, can easily turn into an addiction. While studies of COVID-19’s impact on substance abuse are ongoing, it is predicted that alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use will continue its upward trend. 

How You Can Help

As your company begins to craft its Return to Work strategies, drug testing each employee can help prevent liability issues. It also gives you the ability to offer programs to help employees who may need it. Understanding the signs of addiction can help your employees get the help they need to ease self-destructive behaviors. Signs your employee may be struggling with addiction can include:

  • Unexplained changes in mood/behavior
  • Sleeping at work
  • Decline in overall appearance
  • Frequent tardiness
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Withdrawal from contact with other co-workers or employees
  • Outbursts of aggression 

When building a workplace program, it’s important to have an environment in which employees feels comfortable, and don’t feel like they are being judged or accused of any wrongdoing. Your goal should be to help them help themselves. Keep in mind, there is no easy way to help someone acknowledge or overcome a substance addiction.

If you have immediate concerns about an employee’s drug use as it relates to their personal safety, please contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Helpline — 1-800-662-HELP (4357). A free and confidential service, the helpline will give you information regarding treatment centers and options for your employee. 

How We Can Help

Building a workplace program to help employees manage their addiction during and after COVID-19 can be a difficult challenge. With years of experience and a team dedicated to helping you, ARCpoint Labs has a professional solution for your company. We’re ready to help you craft a workplace program that works for all parties involved so employers can limit liability issues, and your employees can return to work safely. In a time when many individuals are focused on health, it’s important that we take care of ourselves and also our employees with coronavirus testing and drug testing.  

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Alcohol Abuse on the Rise

Alcohol Abuse on the Rise - ARCpoint Labs

In today’s world, it’s easy to know the importance of drug testing. The opiate crisis is taking the front page of every news outlet by storm. But does this allow us to overlook the negative affects of alcohol in the workplace? Recent studies are showing an increase in alcohol consumption, which can have just as much of a negative impact on work safety as drug use. Contact your local ARCpoint Labs today to learn about our alcohol testing options.

Read more in this article about the dangers of alcohol abuse. It is just as important as the opioid epidemic. And who is at more risk?

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Key Elements for Supervisor Signs & Symptoms Training

Key Elements for Supervisor Signs & Symptoms Training

“What should we include in our company’s training program?” is a question we get asked every day, especially when it comes to supervisor education about drug and alcohol abuse at work.

This is a really important question and the answer can be complicated. A program could include everything from live training to role playing. To help you navigate the topic, we’ve included some ‘best practices’ recommendations for Signs & Symptoms training programs.

Yes done tick over stack of check boxes

1) Conduct a comprehensive review of your company’s current drug-free workplace policy. This provides a great baseline.

2) Data about the negative effects of drug and alcohol abuse on the company, employees, and the abuser. Be sure to highlight the pitfalls of turning a blind eye and address the safety concerns. Site specific examples that are relevant to your audience.

3) How to spot common signs and symptoms of drug or alcohol abuse. They are not always obvious, and supervisors need to be educated on what to look for.

4) Proper documentation of observations. If it is not documented, then it didn’t happen. Provide supervisors with a ready-made template to use when a situation arises, that way the necessary information is gathered and recorded.

5) How to intervene and conduct a reasonable suspicion interview. Conflict resolution is key, and so is preparing supervisors for this challenging situation. Your supervisors need the correct support.

6) Test supervisors after training session. Conducting a quiz when training is complete not only ensures content understanding, but it also documents that training has been conducted.

7) Provide a certificate of completion. This is a great tool to recognize those that successfully pass the quiz, and the contribution that they are making to the organization.

At ARCpoint Labs, we’re dedicated to helping your team create a drug and alcohol-free workplace. We’ll help you create a policy and training program that works for your specific business needs.

Click here to find the closest location to you! 

 

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New ARCpoint Labs location opens in Bakersfield, CA

ARCpoint Labs is proud to announce the recent opening of a new location in Bakersfield, CA.

On Tuesday, March 4, ARCpoint Labs of Bakersfield opened its doors to the public. As a third-party provider/administrator, the walk-in facility will serve as a Kern county resource for drug and alcohol testing for workplaces, DOT-compliant companies, individuals, or court-ordered purposes, steroid testing, paternity testing, immigration DNA testing, and more. The Bakersfield location is one of many nationwide facilities developed by ARCpoint Labs, which is associated with the Drug and Alcohol Testing Industry Association (DATIA) and the Substance Abuse Program Administrators Association (SAPAA).

In addition to partnering with Kern county business to provide program assistance and mobile and on-site drug testing — including pre-employment screenings, post-accident, reasonable suspicion, and random drug testing — ARCpoint Labs of Bakersfield hopes to help combat drug and alcohol problems among Bakersfield youth.

The fully-certified ARCpoint Labs of Bakersfield is staffed with technicians who are trained in accordance with federal and state laws on fluid collection and breath alcohol testing. We pride ourselves on providing accurate, reliable, and confidential testing for all clients. With multiple lab affiliations and a nationwide network of over 10,000 collection sites, you can trust ARCpoint Labs to provide quick, reliable testing result.

 

To learn more about the testing services provided by our newest location, call (661) 246-4267 or contact ARCpoint Labs of Bakersfield today.

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